EconStor >
Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), London >
IFS Working Papers, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/47462
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Claireen_US
dc.contributor.authorDearden, Lorraineen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeghir, Costasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-18en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-04T09:18:45Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-04T09:18:45Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/47462-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the impact of month of birth on national achievement test scores in England whilst children are in school, and on subsequent further and higher education participation. Using geographical variation in school admissions policies, we are able to split this difference into an age of starting school or length of schooling effect, and an age of sitting the test effect. We find that the month in which you are born matters for test scores at ages 7, 11, 14 and 16, with younger children performing significantly worse, on average, than their older peers. Furthermore, almost all of this difference is due to the fact that younger children sit exams up to one year earlier than older cohort members. The difference in test scores at age 16 potentially affects the number of pupils who stay on beyond compulsory schooling, with predictable labour market consequences. Indeed, we find that the impact of month of birth persists into higher education (college) decisions, with age 19/20 participation declining monotonically with month of birth. The fact that being young in your school year affects outcomes after the completion of compulsory schooling points to the need for urgent policy reform, to ensure that future cohorts of children are not adversely affected by the month of birth lottery inherent in the English education system.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherInstitute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) Londonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIFS working papers 10,06en_US
dc.subject.jelI21en_US
dc.subject.jelI28en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordEconomics of Educationen_US
dc.subject.keywordMonth of Birthen_US
dc.subject.keywordEducational Outcomesen_US
dc.subject.stwAltersgruppeen_US
dc.subject.stwSchüleren_US
dc.subject.stwKognitionen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsniveauen_US
dc.subject.stwEnglanden_US
dc.titleWhen you are born matters: The impact of date of birth on educational outcomes in Englanden_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn626248108en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:IFS Working Papers, Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
626248108.pdf703.94 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.