EconStor >
European Investment Bank (EIB), Luxembourg >
Economic and Financial Reports, European Investment Bank (EIB) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/45281
  
Title:Relationship lending - empirical evidence for Germany PDF Logo
Authors:Memmel, Christoph
Schmieder, Christian
Stein, Ingrid
Issue Date:2008
Series/Report no.:Economic and financial reports / European Investment Bank 2008/01
Abstract:Relationship lending is a common practice in credit financing all over the world, notably also in the European Union, which has been assumed to be particularly beneficial for Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs). During recent years, there has been the impression that relationship lending loses ground due to a change of the banks' business models, which could ultimately yield to a worsening of the business environment for corporates and SMEs. In this study, we investigate the determinants of relationship lending for Germany, where relationship lending traditionally plays an important role. Compared to previous studies, we refer to much more comprehensive data with information on more than 16,000 firm-bank relationships. Our findings confirm the assumption that relationship lending seems to be an important pillar for economic growth and employment: We find that the firms that are most likely to contribute to (future) economic growth, namely small and R&D-intensive firms, tend to choose a relationship lender. The same is observed for firms of high credit quality, independent of their size or R&D intensity. Furthermore, we also observe that the importance of relationship lending did not decrease since the mid 1990s.
Subjects:relationship banking
German banking system
SME
JEL:G21
G32
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Economic and Financial Reports, European Investment Bank (EIB)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
65664401X.pdf239.62 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/45281

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.