EconStor >
Frankfurt School of Finance and Management, Frankfurt a. M. >
Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/45023
  
Title:Institutions, distributed cognition and agency: rule-following as performative action PDF Logo
Authors:Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten
Issue Date:2011
Series/Report no.:Working paper series // Frankfurt School of Finance & Management 157
Abstract:Recently, Aoki proposed the concept of substantive institutions which relates outcomes of strategic interaction with public representations of equilibrium states of games. I argue that the Aoki model can be grounded in theories of distributed cognition and performativity, which I put into the context of Searle's philosophical account of institutions. Substantive institutions build on regularized causal interactions between internal neuronal mechanisms and external facts, which are shared in a population of agents. Following Searle's proposal to conceive rule following as a neuronally anchored behavioral disposition, I show that his corresponding notion of collective intentionality can be grounded in recent neuroscience theories about imitation as the primordial process in human learning. I relate this with Searle's concept of status function and the neuronal theory of metaphors, resulting in a precise definition of rule-following as performative action. I present two empirical examples, the institution of money and status hierarchies in markets.
Subjects:Aoki's concept of substantive institutions
Searle
collective intentionality
emotions
imitation
performativity
sign systems
JEL:B52
D02
D87
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
651743451.pdf640.75 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/45023

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.