Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/43209
Authors: 
Jappelli, Tullio
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
CFS Working Paper 2010/16
Abstract: 
Many studies show that most people are not financially literate and are unfamiliar with even the most basic economic concepts. However, the evidence on the determinants of economic literacy is scant. This paper uses international panel data on 55 countries from 1995 to 2008, merging indicators of economic literacy with a large set of macroeconomic and institutional variables. Results show that there is substantial heterogeneity of financial and economic competence across countries, and that human capital indicators (PISA test scores and college attendance) are positively correlated with economic literacy. Furthermore, inhabitants of countries with more generous social security systems are generally less literate, lending support to the hypothesis that the incentives to acquire economic literacy are related to the amount of resources available for private accumulation.
Subjects: 
Economic Literacy
Human Capital
Social Security
JEL: 
E2
D8
G1
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
212.15 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.