EconStor >
Universität Hamburg (UHH) >
Fachbereich Volkswirtschaftslehre - Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftspolitik, Universität Hamburg >
Hamburg Contemporary Economic Discussions, Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftspolitik, Universität Hamburg >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/42228
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAllmers, Swantjeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaennig, Wolfgangen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-11en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-03T11:00:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-03T11:00:00Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-940369-57-4en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/42228-
dc.description.abstractThis contribution provides an ex post analysis of the economic impacts of the two most recent single-country World Cups (WCs), Germany 2006 and France 1998. Based on macroeconomic indicators, the experiences of these WCs appear to be in line with existing empirical research on large sporting events and sports stadiums, which have rarely identified significant net economic benefits. Of more significance are the novelty effects of the stadiums, and 'intangible effects' such as the image effect for the host nations and the feel-good effect for the population. The experiences of former WCs provide a context for analysing the scope and limits for South Africa 2010. Like previous host countries, South Africa might have to cope with difficulties such as the underuse of most WC-stadiums in the aftermath of the tournament. On the other hand, this paper examines a handful of arguments why South Africa might realise larger economic benefits than former hosts of WCs, such as the absence of the northern-style 'couch potato effect' and the absence of negative crowding-out effects on regular tourism. Furthermore, the relative scarcity of sport arenas in South Africa might induce a larger positive effect than in countries with ample provision of sports facilities. In addition, against the backdrop of continuous declines in South African poverty since 2001, the novelty effect of new stadiums might be of special importance. Finally, the innovative South African ambitions to use stadiums with 'signature architecture' as a tool for urban development or to generate external effects for the regional economy are different from former WCs.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUniv, Fak. Wirtschafts- und Sozialwiss., Dep. Wirtschaftswiss. Hamburgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesHamburg contemporary economic discussions 21en_US
dc.subject.jelL83en_US
dc.subject.jelR53en_US
dc.subject.jelR58en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordRegional Economicsen_US
dc.subject.keywordSports Economicsen_US
dc.subject.keywordWorld Cupen_US
dc.subject.keywordStadium Impacten_US
dc.subject.keywordFeelgood Factoren_US
dc.titleSouth Africa 2010: Economic scope and limitsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn641120923en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US
Appears in Collections:Hamburg Contemporary Economic Discussions, Lehrstuhl für Wirtschaftspolitik, Universität Hamburg

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
591443171.pdf751.79 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.