EconStor >
Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung (ZEW), Mannheim >
ZEW Discussion Papers >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/41426
  
Title:The heterogeneous effects of training incidence and duration on labor market transitions PDF Logo
Authors:Fitzenberger, Bernd
Osikominu, Aderonke
Paul, Marie
Issue Date:2010
Series/Report no.:ZEW Discussion Papers 10-077
Abstract:This paper estimates the impact of training incidence and duration on employment transitions accounting for the endogeneity of program participation and duration. We specify a very flexible bivariate random effects probit model for employment and training participation and we use Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques for estimation. We develop a simulation approach that uses the estimated coefficients and individual specific effects from the MCMC iterations to calculate the posterior distributions of different treatment effects of interest. Our estimation results imply positive effects of training on the employment probability of the treated, lying between 12 and 21 percentage points ten quarters after program start. The effects are higher for women than for men and higher in West Germany than in East Germany. Further, we find that the effect of training versus waiting underestimates the effect of training versus no training in the medium and long run by a third. Finally, our results show that longer planned enrolment lengths of three and four quarters as opposed to just two quarters lead to an increase in employment rates in the medium and long run by four to eleven percentage points.
Subjects:evaluation
active labor market programs
dynamic non-linear panel data models
MCMC
JEL:J68
C33
C11
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:ZEW Discussion Papers
Publikationen von Forscherinnen und Forschern des ZEW

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
637743482.pdf800.94 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/41426

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.