EconStor >
Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM), Mailand >
FEEM Working Papers, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei  >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/4122
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBerrittella, Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRehdanz, Katrinen_US
dc.contributor.authorTol, Richard S. J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T14:16:53Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T14:16:53Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/4122-
dc.description.abstractWater resources are unevenly spread in China. Especially the basins of the Yellow, Hui and Hai rivers in the North are rather dry. To increase the supply of water in these basins, the South-to-North Water Transfer project (SNWT) was launched. Using a computable general equilibrium model this study estimates the impact of the project on the economy of China and the rest of the world. We contrast three alternative groups of scenarios. All are directly concerned with the South-to-North water transfer project to increase water supply. In the first group of scenarios additional supply implies productivity gains. We call it the non-market” solution. The second group of scenarios is called market solution”. The market price for water adjusts such that supply and demand are equated again. In the third group of simulations the economic implications of China’s capital investment in infrastructure for the water South-North water transfer project is analyzed. Finally, the investment is combined with the increased capacity of water. If an increase in water supply in China leads to an increase in productivity of their water-intensive goods and services (non-market solution) this would result in a huge positive welfare effect from increased production and export. The effect on China's welfare would still be positive, if a market for water would exist (market solution), but the world as a whole would lose. The negative effect for the rest of the world is largely explained by a deterioration of its terms-of-trade. Well functioning water markets in China are unlikely to exist.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) Milano-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFEEM Working Papers 2006,154en_US
dc.subject.jelD58en_US
dc.subject.jelQ25en_US
dc.subject.jelR13en_US
dc.subject.jelQ28en_US
dc.subject.ddc330-
dc.subject.keywordComputable General Equilibriumen_US
dc.subject.keywordSouth-North Water Transfer Project-
dc.subject.keywordWater Policy-
dc.subject.keywordWater Scarcity-
dc.titleThe economic impact of the South-North water transfer project in China: A computable general equilibrium analysisen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn556264169en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:FEEM Working Papers, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei
Publikationen von Forscherinnen und Forschern des IfW

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
15406.pdf1.16 MBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.