EconStor >
Verein für Socialpolitik >
Ausschuss für Entwicklungsländer, Verein für Socialpolitik >
Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, 2010 (Hannover) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/40000
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDanquah, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorOuattara, Osmanen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpeight, Alanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-13T15:07:55Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-13T15:07:55Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/40000-
dc.description.abstractUsing the Malmquist productivity index and panel data methods, we study the role of total human capital and its composition in the technological "catch-up" process and productivity growth via the channels of innovation and adoption of technology in a panel of 19 sub -Saharan African countries between 1960 and 2003. Our findings indicate different roles played by the composition of human capital and a follow-on consistent and significant contribution of total human capital to productivity growth. Primary and secondary school attainment (unskilled labour) contribute significantly to the adoption of technology(the main source of productivity growth in sub-Saharan Africa) whilst tertiary school attainment (skilled labour) plays a significant role in local innovation. Total human capital on the other hand, contribute more significantly to the adoption of technology and innovation. Technological "catch-up" remains a significant element in productivity growth in sub-Saharan Africa and economies with higher tertiary school attainment(skilled labour) and higher total human capital tend to contribute significantly to productivity growth through the channel of technological "catch-up". Our results rather point towards a circuitous depiction of the symbiotic characteristics of the composition of human capital in enhancing productivity growth in sub-Saharan Africa and hence efforts in scaling- up investments in human capital by governments, development partners etc should not be too concentrated on one composition of human capital.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherVerein für Socialpolitik, Ausschuss für Entwicklungsländer Göttingenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 54en_US
dc.subject.jelD24en_US
dc.subject.jelO47en_US
dc.subject.jelO55en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordProductivity growthen_US
dc.subject.keywordHuman capitalen_US
dc.subject.keywordSub-Saharan Africaen_US
dc.titleProductivity growth, human capital and distance to frontier in Sub-Saharan Africaen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn65435233X-
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:gdec10:54-
Appears in Collections:Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, 2010 (Hannover)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
351_danquah.pdf904.27 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.