Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/39915
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRuoff, Gabien_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-13T14:37:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-13T14:37:59Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/39915-
dc.description.abstractThis paper deals with the question whether low- and middle-income countries that are politically better integrated into the international system are able to provide higher levels of environmental quality than could be expected only according to their national income levels. Using time-series cross-section regression analysis of 110 countries for the period 1950-1999 it can be shown that those countries that have signed and ratified more environmental treaties, have significantly lower SO2 emissions than countries that are less integrated into the international system. However, in contrast to theoretical predictions democratic low- and middle-income countries despite their stronger integration into the international system exhibit higher SO2 emissions indicating lower environmental quality than autocratic countries.en_US
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.publisher|aVerein für Socialpolitik, Ausschuss für Entwicklungsländer |cGöttingenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aProceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Zürich 2008 |x37en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleGrow rich and clean up later? International assistance and the provision of environmental quality in low- and middle-income countriesen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn654046425-
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:gdec08:37-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
156.7 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.