EconStor >
Verein für Socialpolitik >
Ausschuss für Entwicklungsländer, Verein für Socialpolitik >
Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, 2008 (Zürich) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/39872
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorde Laiglesia, Juan R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrisson, Christianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-13T14:36:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-13T14:36:57Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/39872-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the relationship between household structures, the institutions that shape them and physical and human capital accumulation using household and individual data from China, Indonesia, Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana. Household structures differ greatly across countries and are very diverse within countries. In the two African countries studied a large share of the population live in extended households and/or polygamous ones. Such household structures are the exception or even absent in the Asian cases, where nuclear monogamous households prevail. This paper finds that polygamy is negatively related to capital accumulation. Wealth per capita is significantly lower in polygamous households even after controlling for income, age and literacy of the household head. A first analysis of the possible channels suggests that the larger size of polygamous households plays an important role. A similar result is found for education: enrolment rates are never higher but frequently lower in these households. The diversity across countries demonstrates that polygamy has very different meanings across societies. Extended households are also examined. The analysis shows that those households that accommodate inactive members of the extended kin group are wealthier than other, comparable households. This result is consistent with accommodation of kin group members acting as a vehicle for solidarity that could also be regarded as a private "tax on success". The implicit transfers embedded in such mechanisms, including fostering, are very high compared to monetary and in-kind transfers and have often been overlooked in the analysis of social relations.en_US
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.publisherVerein für Socialpolitik, Ausschuss für Entwicklungsländer Göttingenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Zürich 2008 8en_US
dc.subject.jelD12en_US
dc.subject.jelJ12en_US
dc.subject.jelO12en_US
dc.subject.jelO16en_US
dc.subject.jelZ10en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordhousehold structureen_US
dc.subject.keywordsavingen_US
dc.subject.keywordpolygamyen_US
dc.subject.keywordfosteringen_US
dc.subject.keywordAfricaen_US
dc.subject.keywordcapital accumulationen_US
dc.titleHousehold Structures and Savings: Evidence from Household Surveysen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn654118450-
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:gdec08:8-
Appears in Collections:Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, 2008 (Zürich)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
AEL_2008_8_delaiglesia.pdf1.18 MBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.