Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36950
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHatton, Timothy J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-11en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-23T09:36:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-23T09:36:17Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/36950-
dc.description.abstractThe first half of the twentieth century saw rapid improvements in the health and height of British children. Average height and health can be related to infant mortality through a positive selection effect and a negative scarring effect. Examining town-level panel data on the heights of school children I find no evidence for the selection effect but some support for the scarring effect. The results suggest that the improvement in the disease environment, as reflected by the decline in infant mortality, increased average height by about half a centimeter per decade in the first half of the twentieth century.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aDiscussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit |x4932en_US
dc.subject.jelI12en_US
dc.subject.jelJ13en_US
dc.subject.jelN34en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordHeights of childrenen_US
dc.subject.keywordinfant mortalityen_US
dc.subject.keywordhealth in Britainen_US
dc.subject.stwKindersterblichkeiten_US
dc.subject.stwKinderen_US
dc.subject.stwGesundheiten_US
dc.subject.stwGro├čbritannienen_US
dc.titleInfant mortality and the health of survivors: Britain 1910 - 1950en_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn625857623en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
343.32 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.