EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36784
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, Anthony B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLeigh, Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-11en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-23T09:32:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-23T09:32:08Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/36784-
dc.description.abstractTaxation data have been used to create long-run series for the distribution of top incomes in quite a number of countries. Most of these studies have focused on the national experience of individual countries, but we can also learn from cross-country comparisons. Comparative analysis is therefore the next stage in the research program. At the same time, we know from other fields that there are dangers in simply pooling all available time series, without regard to the specific nature of data and reality. In this paper, we therefore adopt an intermediate approach, taking five Anglo-Saxon countries that have relatively similar backgrounds and tax systems: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK, and the US. The first part of the paper tackles the challenge of comparability of income-tax based estimates across countries and across time. The second part summarizes the evidence about top income shares. Across these five countries, the shares of the very richest exhibit a strikingly similar pattern, falling in the three decades after World War II, before rising sharply from the mid-1970s onwards. The share of the top 1 percent is highly correlated across Anglo-Saxon countries, more so than the share of the next 4 percent. The third part of the paper looks at the relationship between taxes and top income shares. Controlling for country and year fixed effects, we find that a reduction in the marginal tax rate on wage income is associated with an increase in the share of the top percentile group. Likewise, a fall in the marginal tax rate on investment income (based on a lagged moving average) is associated with a rise in the share of the top percentile group.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 4937en_US
dc.subject.jelD31en_US
dc.subject.jelH23en_US
dc.subject.jelN30en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordInequalityen_US
dc.subject.keywordtaxationen_US
dc.subject.keywordAustraliaen_US
dc.subject.keywordCanadaen_US
dc.subject.keywordNew Zealanden_US
dc.subject.keywordUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.subject.keywordUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.stwEinkommensverteilungen_US
dc.subject.stwReichtumen_US
dc.subject.stwEinkommensteueren_US
dc.subject.stwSteuerinzidenzen_US
dc.subject.stwVergleichen_US
dc.subject.stwAustralienen_US
dc.subject.stwKanadaen_US
dc.subject.stwNeuseelanden_US
dc.subject.stwGro├čbritannienen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleThe distribution of top incomes in five Anglo-Saxon countries over the twentieth centuryen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn625879287en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
625879287.pdf270.98 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.