EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36374
  
Title:Family networks and school enrolment: evidence from a randomized social experiment PDF Logo
Authors:Angelucci, Manuela
De Giorgi, Giacomo
Rangel, Marcos A.
Rasul, Imran
Issue Date:2009
Series/Report no.:IZA Discussion Papers 4497
Abstract:We present evidence on whether and how a household's behavior is influenced by the presence and characteristics of its extended family. Using data from the PROGRESA program in Mexico, we exploit information on the paternal and maternal surnames of heads and spouses in conjunction with the Spanish naming convention to identify the inter and intra generational family links of each household to others in the same village. We then exploit the randomized research design of the PROGRESA evaluation data to identify whether the treatment effects of PROGRESA transfers on secondary school enrolment vary according to the characteristics of extended family. We find PROGRESA only raises secondary enrolment among households that are embedded in a family network. Eligible but isolated households do not respond. The mechanism through which the extended family influences household schooling choices is the redistribution of resources within the family network from eligibles that receive de facto unconditional cash transfers from PROGRESA, towards eligibles on the margin of enrolling children into secondary school.
Subjects:Extended family network
PROGRESA
resource sharing
schooling
JEL:I21
J12
O12
Persistent Identifier of the first edition:urn:nbn:de:101:1-200911021620
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
614343267.pdf679.98 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36374

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.