Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36229
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBauman, Yoramen_US
dc.contributor.authorRose, Elainaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-02en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T12:07:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T12:07:04Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/36229-
dc.description.abstractA substantial body of research suggests that economists are less generous than other professionals and that economics students are less generous than other students. We address this question using administrative data on donations to social programs by students at the University of Washington. Our data set allows us to track student donations and economics training over time in order to distinguish selection effects from indoctrination effects. We find that economics majors are less likely to donate than other students and that there is an indoctrination effect for non-majors but not for majors. Women majors and non-majors are less likely to contribute than comparable men.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion Papers |x4625en_US
dc.subject.jelA13en_US
dc.subject.jelD64en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordAltruismen_US
dc.subject.keywordpublic goodsen_US
dc.subject.stwStudierendeen_US
dc.subject.stwWirtschaftsstudiumen_US
dc.subject.stwIdeologieen_US
dc.subject.stwEigeninteresseen_US
dc.subject.stwAltruismusen_US
dc.subject.stwSpendeen_US
dc.subject.stwTesten_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleWhy are economics students more selfish than the rest?en_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn617554374en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
483.27 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.