Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36222
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHamermesh, Daniel S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-09en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T12:07:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T12:07:01Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/36222-
dc.description.abstractUsing the 2006-07 American Time Use Survey and its Eating and Health Module, I show that over half of adult Americans report grazing (secondary eating/drinking) on a typical day, with grazing time almost equaling primary eating/drinking time. An economic model predicts that higher wage rates (price of time) will lead to substitution of grazing for primary eating/drinking, especially by raising the number of grazing incidents relative to meals. This prediction is confirmed in these data. Eating meals more frequently is associated with lower BMI and better self-reported health, as is grazing more frequently. Food purchases are positively related to time spent eating - substitution of goods for time is difficult - but are lower when eating time is spread over more meals.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion Papers |x4378en_US
dc.subject.jelJ10en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordTime useen_US
dc.subject.keywordBMIen_US
dc.subject.keywordhousehold productionen_US
dc.subject.stwGesundheitsvorsorgeen_US
dc.subject.stwErnährungsgewohnheiten_US
dc.subject.stwGesundheitsrisikoen_US
dc.subject.stwEinkommenen_US
dc.subject.stwZeiten_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleGrazing, goods and girth: determinants and effectsen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn612432939en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
211.06 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.