EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36196
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTausch, Arnoen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeshmati, Almasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-26en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T12:06:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T12:06:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/36196-
dc.description.abstractThis article reflects the renewed interest of economics and the social science discipline in value systems and religion. The World Values Survey provided a data framework of global value change, whose quantitative results led Barro (2004) to analyze the connections between some dimensions of recent sociological religious value research with economic growth. The present essay starts from this methodological position, and links value systems with economic performance in a much wider and macrosociological framework. We further develop the well-known Inglehart and Welzel (2003) map of global values, and develop the idea of Asabiyya (social cohesion), as a counter-model to both Barro and Inglehart and Welzel approaches. A frequently asked question is whether modernization without spiritual values in a globalized world economy and world society possible in the long run? Starting from principal component analysis, it is shown that rather two factors are decisive in understanding global value change: a continuum of traditional versus secular, and a continuum cheating versus active society. Asabiyya in the 21st Century, as a way out from the modernization trap of societies, characterized by large-scale social anomaly, is a high secularism combined with a high active society score, thus avoiding the modernization trap. We show that economic growth in the current world crisis is far more connected with these dimensions. We conclude that not a society based on fear is needed in the first place, but an active society of volunteer social work.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherForschungsinst. zur Zukunft der Arbeit Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion Papers 4459en_US
dc.subject.jelC43en_US
dc.subject.jelF5en_US
dc.subject.jelZ12en_US
dc.subject.jelD73en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordIndex numbers and aggregationen_US
dc.subject.keywordinternational political economyen_US
dc.subject.keywordreligionen_US
dc.subject.keywordbureaucracyen_US
dc.subject.keywordcorruptionen_US
dc.subject.stwReligionen_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Werteen_US
dc.subject.stwSozialer Wandelen_US
dc.subject.stwGlobalisierungen_US
dc.subject.stwPublic Choiceen_US
dc.subject.stwWirtschaftswachstumen_US
dc.subject.stwWelten_US
dc.titleAsabiyya: re-interpreting value change in globalized societiesen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn613726413en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
613726413.pdf681.81 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.