EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36150
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBardasi, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeegle, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDillon, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorSerneels, Pieteren_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-05en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T12:06:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T12:06:25Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/36150-
dc.description.abstractLabor market statistics are critical for assessing and understanding economic development. In practice, widespread variation exists in how labor statistics are measured in household surveys in low-income countries. Little is known whether these differences have an effect on the labor statistics they produce. This paper analyzes these effects by implementing a survey experiment in Tanzania that varied two key dimensions: the level of detail of the questions and the type of respondent. Significant differences are observed across survey designs with respect to different labor statistics. Labor force participation rates, for example, vary by as much as 10 percentage points across the four survey assignments. Using a short labor module without screening questions on employment generates lower female labor force participation and lower rates of wage employment for both men and women. Response by proxy rather than self-report yields lower male labor force participation, lower female working hours, and lower employment in agriculture for men. The differences between proxy and self reporting seem to come from information imperfections within the household, especially with the distance in age between respondent and subject playing an important role, while gender and educational differences seem less important.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion Papers 4733en_US
dc.subject.jelJ21en_US
dc.subject.jelC83en_US
dc.subject.jelC93en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordLabor statisticsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsurvey designen_US
dc.subject.keywordTanzaniaen_US
dc.subject.keywordfield experimenten_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsmarktstatistiken_US
dc.subject.stwBefragungen_US
dc.subject.stwFeldforschungen_US
dc.subject.stwTansaniaen_US
dc.subject.stwLow-Income Countriesen_US
dc.titleDo labor statistics depend on how and to whom the questions are asked? Results from a survey experiment in Tanzaniaen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn620399295en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
620399295.pdf344.52 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.