Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36056
Authors: 
Boudarbat, Brahim
Chernoff, Victor
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 4513
Abstract: 
This study uses data from the Follow-up of Graduates Survey - Class of 2000, to look at the determinants of education-job match among Canadian university graduates. From a public policy perspective, the question of education-job match is relevant given the substantial investment society puts into its postsecondary institutions, and the role devoted to human capital in economic development. Our results indicate that one graduate out of three (35.1%) is in a job that is not closely related to his or her education. The most important result is that demographic and socioeconomic characteristics (gender and family background) do not significantly affect the match. On the other hand, education characteristics strongly influence match, with field specific programs (such as Health sciences and Education) having the highest likelihood of obtaining an education-job match. In addition, the level of education (i.e. graduates with a postgraduate degree vs. a bachelor degree), as well as good grades, strongly affect the match. Employment characteristics also affect the match, but to a mixed extent, with certain characteristics, such as industry, as well as working full-time (vs. part time) affecting the match to a strong extent, while others, such as the permanence of employment, as well as the method used to obtain employment, not having a significant effect on match.
Subjects: 
Education-job match
university graduates
Canada
Follow-up of Graduates Survey
JEL: 
J24
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
328.2 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.