EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35805
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBevelander, Pieteren_US
dc.contributor.authorPendakur, Ravien_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-22en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:58:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:58:39Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-20081126191en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/35805-
dc.description.abstractThree decades ago, Sweden extended municipal and county voting privileges to non-citizen residents arguing that it would increase political influence, interest and self-esteem among foreign citizens. Three decades later, electoral participation on the part of immigrants is perceived as being substantially lower than for native born citizens and questions have arisen regarding the degree to which this may be symptomatic of a larger integration issue. The aim of this paper is to explore the determinants of voting within the context of social inclusion by comparing immigrants, their descendants and native citizens in Sweden while controlling for a range of socio-economic, demographic characteristics and contextual factors. We use two unique sets of data to conduct our research. The 2006 Electoral Participation Survey contains information on individual electoral participation in national, county and municipal elections. We match this information to registry data from Statistics Sweden which contains socio-demographic information for every Swedish resident. From these two sources, we are able to create a database which matches voting behaviour to individual characteristics for more than 70,000 residents of whom almost 13,000 are not citizens. We find that after controlling for demographic, socio-economic and contextual characteristics, acquisition of citizenship makes a real difference to the odds of voting and is therefore, a likely and powerful indicator of social inclusion. Immigrants who obtain citizenship are far more likely to vote than those who do not. Arguably, some of this may be attributed to the number of years of residency in the country. However, even non-citizens born in Sweden have substantially lower odds of voting. Country of birth also makes a difference. Immigrants from the Americas and those born in Sweden with immigrant parents are more likely to vote than immigrants from other countries. Somewhat surprisingly, age at immigration does not make a substantial difference to the odds of voting.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA discussion papers 3764en_US
dc.subject.jelD72en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordPolitical participationen_US
dc.subject.keywordimmigrantsen_US
dc.subject.keyworddescendantsen_US
dc.subject.keywordelectoral participationen_US
dc.subject.keywordhuman capitalen_US
dc.subject.keywordcitizenshipen_US
dc.subject.keywordsocial inclusionen_US
dc.subject.stwWahlbeteiligungen_US
dc.subject.stwMigrantenen_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Integrationen_US
dc.subject.stwStaatsangehörigkeiten_US
dc.subject.stwHumankapitalen_US
dc.subject.stwSchwedenen_US
dc.titleElectoral participation as a measure of social inclusion for natives, immigrants and descendants in Swedenen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn583112331en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
583112331.pdf422.48 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.