EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35722
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBhalotra, Soniaen_US
dc.contributor.authorValente, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Soest, Arthuren_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-06en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:55:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:55:45Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-20090304418en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/35722-
dc.description.abstractThe socio-economic status of Indian Muslims is, on average, considerably lower than that of upper caste Hindus. Muslims have higher fertility and shorter birth spacing and are a minority group that, it has been argued, have poorer access to public goods. They nevertheless exhibit substantially higher child survival rates, and have done for decades. This paper documents and analyses this seeming puzzle. The religion gap in survival is much larger than the gender gap but, in contrast to the gender gap, it has not received much political or academic attention. A decomposition of the survival differential reveals that some compositional effects favour Muslims but that, overall, differences in characteristics between the communities and especially the Muslim deficit in parental education predict a Hindu advantage. Alternative outcomes and specifications support our finding of a Muslim fixed effect that favours survival. The results of this study contribute to a recent literature that debates the importance of socioeconomic status (SES) in determining health and survival. They augment a growing literature on the role of religion or culture as encapsulating important unobservable behaviours or endowments that influence health, indeed, enough to reverse the SES gradient that is commonly observed.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA discussion papers 4009en_US
dc.subject.jelO12en_US
dc.subject.jelI12en_US
dc.subject.jelJ15en_US
dc.subject.jelJ16en_US
dc.subject.jelJ18en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordReligionen_US
dc.subject.keywordcasteen_US
dc.subject.keywordgenderen_US
dc.subject.keywordchild survivalen_US
dc.subject.keywordanthropometricsen_US
dc.subject.keywordHinduen_US
dc.subject.keywordMuslimen_US
dc.subject.keywordIndiaen_US
dc.subject.stwKindersterblichkeiten_US
dc.subject.stwReligionen_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Schichten_US
dc.subject.stwVergleichen_US
dc.subject.stwHinduismusen_US
dc.subject.stwIslamen_US
dc.subject.stwIndienen_US
dc.titleThe puzzle of Muslim advantage in child survival in Indiaen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn593237862en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
593237862.pdf369.39 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.