EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35545
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCarlino, Gerald A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSaiz, Alberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-11-04en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:53:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:53:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-20081126376en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/35545-
dc.description.abstractThe city beautiful movement, which in the early 20th Century advocated city beautification as a way to improve the living conditions and civic virtues of the urban dweller, had languished by the Great Depression. Today, new urban economic theory and policymakers are coming to see the provision of consumer leisure amenities as a way to attract population, especially the highly skilled and their employers. However, past studies have only provided indirect evidence of the importance of leisure amenities for urban development. In this paper we propose and validate the number of leisure trips to MSAs as a measure of consumer revealed preferences for local leisure-oriented amenities. Population and employment growth in the 1990s was about 2 percent higher in an MSA with twice as many leisure visits: the third most important predictor of recent population growth in standardized terms. Moreover, this variable does a good job at forecasting out-of-sample growth for the period 2000-2006. Beautiful cities disproportionally attracted highly-educated individuals, and experienced faster housing price appreciation, especially in supply-inelastic markets. Investment by local government in new public recreational areas within an MSA was positively associated with higher subsequent city attractiveness. In contrast to the generally declining trends in the American central city, neighborhoods that were close to central recreational districts have experienced economic growth, albeit at the cost of minority displacement.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA discussion papers 3778en_US
dc.subject.jelJ11en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordInternal migrationen_US
dc.subject.keywordamenitiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordurban population growthen_US
dc.subject.stwStadtentwicklungen_US
dc.subject.stwKommunalplanungen_US
dc.subject.stwGrünflächeen_US
dc.subject.stwErholungsgebieten_US
dc.subject.stwSportanlageen_US
dc.subject.stwStadtwachstumen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleCity beautifulen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn584276265en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
584276265.pdf427.38 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.