EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35184
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHerrmann, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorTausch, Arnoen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeshmati, Almasen_US
dc.contributor.authorBajalan, Chemen S.J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-19en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:34:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:34:35Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-2008052722en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/35184-
dc.description.abstractIn this qualitative sociological and quantitative economic policy paper, we start out from the assumption of a very recent European Commission Background paper on the Efficiency and effectiveness of social spending, which says the effectiveness of social spending can be defined by the degree to which the realized allocation approaches the socially desired outcome. The conclusions listed in the Commission paper are found far reaching and not supported by the empirical data. We perform such an analysis, starting from advances in recent literature. A more encompassing sociological perspective on the issue and factor analytical calculations is presented, which supports our general argument about the efficiency of the Scandinavian model. The social quality approach provides an alternative perspective on welfare system analysis, focusing on public policies rather than social policies. The empirical evidence, suggests that in terms of the efficiency of the European social model, the geography of comparative performance include: the direct action against social exclusion, health and family social expenditures, the neo-liberal approach, and the unemployment benefit centred approach. Applying rigorous comparative social science methodology, we also arrive at the conclusion that in terms of the initial ECOFIN definition of efficiency, the data presented in this article suggest that apart from Finland and the Netherlands, three new EU-27 member countries, especially the Czech Republic and Slovenia, provide interesting answers to the question about the efficiency of state expenditures in reducing poverty rates.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion Papers 3482en_US
dc.subject.jelC43en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordSocial spendingen_US
dc.subject.keywordEuropean Commissionen_US
dc.subject.keywordindex numbers and aggregationen_US
dc.subject.keywordcross-sectional modelsen_US
dc.subject.keywordspatial modelsen_US
dc.subject.keywordeconomic integrationen_US
dc.subject.keywordregional economic activityen_US
dc.subject.keywordinternational factor movementsen_US
dc.subject.keywordinternational political economyen_US
dc.subject.stwSozialstaaten_US
dc.subject.stwÖffentliche Sozialausgabenen_US
dc.subject.stwWirkungsanalyseen_US
dc.subject.stwArmutspolitiken_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Lageen_US
dc.subject.stwEU-Staatenen_US
dc.subject.stwEU-Staaten (Osteuropa)en_US
dc.titleEfficiency and effectiveness of social spendingen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn571194222en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
571194222.pdf1.79 MBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.