Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35061
Authors: 
Clark, Damon
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 3182
Abstract: 
In this paper I consider the impact of attending a selective high school in the UK. Students are assigned to these schools on the basis of a test taken in primary school and, using data on these assignment test scores for a particular district, I exploit this rule to estimate the causal effects of selective schools on test scores, high school course taking and university enrollment. Despite the huge peer advantage enjoyed by selective school students, I show that four years of selective school attendance generates at best small effects on test scores. Selective schools do however have positive effects on course-taking and university enrollment, evidence suggesting they may have important longer run impacts.
Subjects: 
Selective schools
education
instrumental variables
JEL: 
C21
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
460.61 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.