EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34981
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFleisher, Belton M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Haizhengen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Min Qiangen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-02en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:31:14Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:31:14Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-2008071112en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/34981-
dc.description.abstractWe study the dispersion in rates of provincial economic- and TFP growth in China. Our results show that regional growth patterns can be understood as a function of several interrelated factors, which include investment in physical capital, human capital, and infrastructure capital; the infusion of new technology and its regional spread; and market reforms, with a major step forward occurring following Deng Xiaoping's South Trip in 1992. We find that FDI had much larger effect on TFP growth before 1994 than after, and we attribute this to emergence of other channels of technology transfer when marketization accelerated. We find that human capital positively affects output per worker and productivity growth. In particular, in terms of its direct contribution to production, educated labor has a much higher marginal product. Moreover, we estimate a positive, direct effect of human capital on TFP growth. This direct effect is hypothesized to come from domestic innovation activities. The estimated spillover effect of human capital on TFP growth is positive and statistically significant, which is very robust to model specifications and estimation methods. The spillover effect appears to be much stronger before 1994. We conduct cost-benefit analysis and a policy experiment, in which we project the impact of increases in human capital and infrastructure capital on regional inequality. We conclude that investing in human capital will be an effective policy to reduce regional gaps in China as well as an efficient means to promote economic growth.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion Papers 3576en_US
dc.subject.jelO15en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordChinaen_US
dc.subject.keywordTFP growthen_US
dc.subject.keywordeconomic growthen_US
dc.subject.keywordhuman capitalen_US
dc.subject.keywordinfrastructureen_US
dc.subject.stwRegionales Wachstumen_US
dc.subject.stwRegionale Disparitäten_US
dc.subject.stwProduktivitäten_US
dc.subject.stwWirtschaftswachstumen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsinvestitionen_US
dc.subject.stwDirektinvestitionen_US
dc.subject.stwInfrastrukturinvestitionen_US
dc.subject.stwSpillover-Effekten_US
dc.subject.stwChinaen_US
dc.titleHuman capital, economic growth, and regional inequality in Chinaen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn573334765en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
573334765.pdf773.6 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.