EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34871
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDevereux, Paul J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHart, Robert A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-05en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:30:20Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:30:20Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/34871-
dc.description.abstractDo students benefit from compulsory schooling? Researchers using changes in compulsory schooling laws as instruments have typically estimated very high returns to additional schooling that are greater than the corresponding OLS estimates and concluded that the group of individuals who are influenced by the law change have particularly high returns to education. That is, the Local Average Treatment Effect (LATE) is larger than the average treatment effect (ATE). However, studies of a 1947 British compulsory schooling law change that impacted about half the relevant population have also found very high instrumental variables returns to schooling (about 15%), suggesting that the ATE of schooling is also very high and higher than OLS estimates suggest. We utilize the New Earnings Survey Panel Data-set (NESPD), that has superior earnings information compared to the datasets previously used and find instrumental variable estimates that are small and much lower than OLS. In fact, there is no evidence of any positive return for women and the return for men is in the 4-7% range. These estimates provide no evidence that the ATE of schooling is very high.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion Papers 3305en_US
dc.subject.jelJ01en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordCompulsory schoolingen_US
dc.subject.keywordreturn to educationen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungspolitiken_US
dc.subject.stwSchuleen_US
dc.subject.stwSchulrechten_US
dc.subject.stwVerhaltensökonomiken_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsertragen_US
dc.subject.stwGroßbritannienen_US
dc.titleForced to be rich? returns to compulsory schooling in Britainen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn559866666en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
559866666.pdf133.16 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.