EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34869
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorde Mel, Sureshen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodruff, Christopheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-14en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:30:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:30:18Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-2008111452en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/34869-
dc.description.abstractIn a recent randomized experiment we found mean returns to capital of between 5 and 6 percent per month in Sri Lankan microenterprises, much higher than market interest rates. But returns were found to be much higher among men than among women, and indeed were not different from zero for women. In this paper, we explore different explanations for the lower returns among female owners. We find no evidence that the gender gap is explained by differences in ability, risk aversion, or entrepreneurial attitudes. Nor do we find that differential access to unpaid family labor or social constraints limiting sales to local areas are important. We do find evidence that women invested the grants differently from men. A smaller share of the smaller grants remained in the female-owned enterprises, and men were more likely to spend the grant on working capital and women on equipment. We also find that the gender gap is largest when we compare male-dominated sectors to female-dominated sectors, although female returns are lower than male returns even for females working in the same industries as men. We then examine the heterogeneity of returns to determine whether any group of businesses owned by women benefit from easing capital constraints. The results suggest there is a large group of high-return male owners and smaller group of poor, high-ability, female owners who might benefit from more access to capital.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA discussion papers 3743en_US
dc.subject.jelO12en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordMicroenterprisesen_US
dc.subject.keywordgenderen_US
dc.subject.keywordmicrofinanceen_US
dc.subject.keywordrandomized experimenten_US
dc.subject.stwKlein- und Mittelunternehmenen_US
dc.subject.stwMikrofinanzierungen_US
dc.subject.stwVerschuldungsrestriktionen_US
dc.subject.stwFrauenen_US
dc.subject.stwSri Lankaen_US
dc.titleAre women more credit constrained? Experimental evidence on gender and microenterprise returnsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn58179186Xen_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
58179186X.pdf358.27 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.