EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34806
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHartog, Joopen_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Praag, C. Mirjamen_US
dc.contributor.authorvan der Sluis, Justinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-24en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:29:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:29:33Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-20080825251en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/34806-
dc.description.abstractHow valuable are cognitive and social abilities for entrepreneurs' incomes as compared to employees? We answer three questions: (1) To what extent does a composite measure of ability affect an entrepreneur's earnings relative to employees? (2) Do different cognitive abilities (e.g. math ability, language ability) and social ability affect earnings of entrepreneurs and employees differently?, and (3) Does the balance in these measured ability levels affect an individual's earnings? Our individual fixed-effects estimates of the differential returns to ability for spells in entrepreneurship versus wage employment account for selectivity into entrepreneurial positions as determined by fixed individual characteristics. General ability has a stronger impact on entrepreneurial incomes than on wages. Entrepreneurs and employees benefit from different sets of specific abilities: Language and clerical abilities have a stronger impact on wages, whereas mathematical, social and technical ability affect entrepreneurial incomes more strongly. The balance in the various kinds of ability also generates a higher income, but only for entrepreneurs: This finding supports Lazear's Jack-of-all-Trades theory.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion Papers 3648en_US
dc.subject.jelJ23en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keyword(Non-)cognitive abilitiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordintelligenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordearningsen_US
dc.subject.keywordentrepreneur(ship)en_US
dc.subject.keywordwage employmenten_US
dc.subject.keywordincome differentialsen_US
dc.subject.stwBerufswahlen_US
dc.subject.stwUnternehmeren_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitskräfteen_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Kompetenzen_US
dc.subject.stwKognitionen_US
dc.subject.stwErwerbsverlaufen_US
dc.subject.stwEinkommenen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleIf you are so smart, why aren't you an entrepreneur? Returns to cognitive and social ability ; entrepreneurs versus employeesen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn577674897en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
577674897.pdf290.81 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.