Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34467
Authors: 
Zavodny, Madeline
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 3192
Abstract: 
It is well-known that married men earn more than comparable single men, with typical estimates of the male marriage premium in the range of 10 to 20 percent. Some research also finds that cohabiting men earn more than men not living with a female partner. This study uses data from the General Social Survey and the National Health and Social Life Survey to examine whether a similar premium accrues to gay men who live with a male partner and whether cohabiting gay men have different observable characteristics than non-cohabiting gay men. Controlling for observable characteristics, cohabiting gay men do not earn significantly more than other gay men or more than unmarried heterosexual men. Cohabiting heterosexual men also do not earn more than non-cohabiting heterosexual men.
Subjects: 
Male marriage premium
gay
heterosexual
JEL: 
J12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
219.62 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.