EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34316
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPagés, Carmenen_US
dc.contributor.authorStampini, Marcoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-04en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:22:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:22:18Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/34316-
dc.description.abstractThis paper assesses labor market segmentation across formal and informal salaried jobs and self-employment in three Latin American and three transition countries. It looks separately at the markets for skilled and unskilled labor, inquiring if segmentation is an exclusive feature of the latter. Longitudinal data are used to assess wage differentials and mobility patterns across jobs. To study mobility, the paper compares observed transitions with a new benchmark measure of mobility under the assumption of no segmentation. It finds evidence of a formal wage premium relative to informal salaried jobs in the three Latin American countries, but not in transition economies. It also finds evidence of extensive mobility across these two types of jobs in all countries, particularly from informal salaried to formal jobs. These patterns are suggestive of a preference for formal over informal salaried jobs in all countries. In contrast, there is little mobility between self-employment and formal salaried jobs, suggesting the existence of barriers to this type of mobility or a strong assortative matching according to workers' individual preferences. Lastly, for both wage differentials and mobility, there is no statistical difference across skill levels, indicating that the markets for skilled and unskilled labor are similarly affected by segmentation.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion Papers 3187en_US
dc.subject.jelJ21en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordLabor mobilityen_US
dc.subject.keywordsegmentationen_US
dc.subject.keywordbarriers to entryen_US
dc.subject.keywordskillsen_US
dc.subject.keywordinformalityen_US
dc.subject.keywordLatin Americaen_US
dc.subject.keywordtransition economiesen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsmarktsegmentierungen_US
dc.subject.stwQualifikationen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsmobilitäten_US
dc.subject.stwSelbstständigeen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsniveauen_US
dc.subject.stwAlbanienen_US
dc.subject.stwGeorgienen_US
dc.subject.stwUkraineen_US
dc.subject.stwArgentinienen_US
dc.subject.stwMexikoen_US
dc.subject.stwVenezuelaen_US
dc.titleNo education, no good jobs? Evidence on the relationship between education and labor market segmentationen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn556345797en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
556345797.pdf239.74 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.