EconStor >
Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn >
IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34264
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLofstrom, Magnusen_US
dc.contributor.authorBates, Timothyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-23en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:21:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:21:34Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/34264-
dc.description.abstractThis study examines causes of black/white gaps in business ownership and self-employment rates by analyzing small-business entry and exit patterns. We proceed by recognizing heterogeneity in business ownership across different industry groups: a classification of firms by human- and financial-capital intensiveness, or entry barriers, we find, is useful for explaining racial differences in entrepreneurship. The barriers facing aspiring entrepreneurs seeking entry into low-barrier industries differ substantially from those limiting entry into high-barrier industries. Higher entry and lower exit rates typifying whites, relative to African Americans, are traditionally interpreted as reflections of the greater financial- and human-capital resources possessed by non-minorities. This consensus view, however, is simplistic. While education background is a powerful predictor of self-employment patterns in the low-barrier industries, advanced educational credentials actually predict lower entry: college graduates are less likely to select into low-barrier small business ownership. In the high-barrier fields, in contrast, college-educated individuals are more likely than less educated persons to enter into self employment. Overall, black presence in high-barrier fields is held down by lower net asset holdings and weaker educational credentials of potential and actual entrepreneurs. In the low-barrier industries, where the majority of black-owned businesses operate, net worth levels and educational backgrounds are trumped by the racial characteristic: low black entry and high exit rates are powerfully predicted by one's race.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIZA Bonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion Papers 3156en_US
dc.subject.jelJ15en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordSelf-employmenten_US
dc.subject.keywordentrepreneurshipen_US
dc.subject.keywordentry barriersen_US
dc.subject.keywordAfrican Americanen_US
dc.subject.stwSelbstständigeen_US
dc.subject.stwUnternehmeren_US
dc.subject.stwFarbige Bevölkerungen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsniveauen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleAfrican Americansà pursuit of self-employmenten_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn552644668en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IZA Discussion Papers, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
552644668.pdf98.42 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.