Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/33316
Authors: 
Stutzer, Alois
Frey, Bruno S.
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 1952
Abstract: 
Neoclassical economic theory rules out systematic errors in consumption choice. According to the basic view, individuals know what they choose. They are able to predict how much utility an activity or a good produces for them now and in the future and they can maximize their utility. This implies that behavior reveals consistent preferences. This approach makes it impossible to detect and understand sub-optimal consumption decisions, due to problems of self-control and the misprediction of utility. We propose the economics of happiness as a methodological approach to study these phenomena. Based on proxy measures for experienced utility, it is, in principle, possible to directly address whether some observed behavior is sub-optimal and is therefore reducing a person's well-being. We discuss recent evidence on smoking and eating habits, TV viewing and commuting choice.
Subjects: 
adaptation
individual decision-making
revealed preference
self-control
subjective well-being
utility misprediction
JEL: 
D00
D11
D12
D84
D91
I12
I31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
279.31 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.