EconStor >
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen >
cege - Centrum für Europa-, Governance- und Entwicklungsforschung, Universität Göttingen >
cege-Diskussionspapiere, Universität Göttingen >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31993
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLunn, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteen, Todd P.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-07en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-14T11:54:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-14T11:54:43Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/31993-
dc.description.abstractSelf-employment rates differ widely across industries and across racial and ethnic categories. The former is relatively easy for economists to explain while the latter differences are more difficult. Self-employment is rare in industries for which production is characterized by substantial economies of scale. Self-employment is more common in services than in manufacturing, although it is greatest in agriculture. There are also substantial differences in self-employment across countries, with the evidence suggesting an inverse relationship between self-employment and economic development. For the United States, self- employment rates tend to be higher in less densely populated states because self-employment rates are greater when average firm size is smaller (Lunn and Steen, 2000). According to some people, differences in self-employment rates across racial and ethnic categories are due to discrimination. Self-employment rates are higher for whites than other racial/ethnic groups, and are higher for men than for women. The numerous programs initiated by state and local governments to assist minority- and women-owned businesses usually offer discrimination against minorities and women as a rationale for the programs. However, self-employment rates often differ widely across more narrowly defined groups within broader racial or ethnic classifications. Within the United States, there is a relatively large gap between self-employment rates of Mexicans and Cubans, and a larger gap between Koreans and Laotians. Fairlie (1996) reports self-employment rates for Russians of 24.9 percent and 10.5 percent for Belgians. These differences in self-employment rates within broader classifications (Hispanics, Asians, and Europeans) suggest that discrimination may not be the primary cause. In this paper, we examine self-employment rates among various ethnic groups within the broader classification of Asian to illustrate the heterogeneity of the self-employed, and to discuss the implications of this heterogeneity.en
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherCenter for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Göttingenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCeGE Discussion Paper 6en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleThe heterogeneity of self-employment: The example of Asians in the United Statesen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn500237980en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:cegedp:6-
Appears in Collections:cege-Diskussionspapiere, Universität Göttingen

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
500237980.pdf176.78 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.