EconStor >
Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg >
IAB-Discussion Paper, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31934
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBrixy, Udoen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrotz, Reinholden_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-09en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-14T11:23:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-14T11:23:15Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/31934-
dc.description.abstractThere is a large body of literature on the determinants of regional variation in new firm formation. In contrast there are few articles on the spatial differences in new firm survival. Using panel data we analyse both items for 74 western German regions over a ten-year period. The positive relationship between entry and exit which is often stated suggests a negative correlation between entry and survival. On the other hand, however, it seems convincing that regions with high birth rates should also have high survival rates, because a favourable environment for the founding of new firms should also be encouraging for the development of these firms. However, an analysis of both rates for 74 western German regions over a ten-year period reveals the existence of a negative relationship in general. This means that the survival rates are below average in regions with high birth rates. Despite this overall correlation, however, it is shown that the spatial pattern of a combination of both rates is complex, and all types of possible relationships exist. With a multivariate panel analysis we study the factors that influence regional birth and survival rates using the same set of independent variables. It is shown that in the service sector most variables literally work in opposite directions in the birth and survival rates models. But this does not hold for the manufacturing sector. This can be rated as evidence for the 'supportive environment thesis'. The reason for this is a completely different outcome of the estimated birth rates models for both industry sectors, whereas there are only minor differences in the estimated survival rate models. We can therefore deduce firstly that the two industries have different requirements for their 'seed bed' but not for their further successful development; and secondly, that the spatial structures which increase the number of newly founded businesses in the service sector are detrimental to the survival rates of newly founded firms.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIAB Nürnbergen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIAB discussion paper 2006,5en_US
dc.subject.jelR11en_US
dc.subject.jelJ23en_US
dc.subject.jelL25en_US
dc.subject.jelM13en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordUnternehmensgründungen_US
dc.subject.keywordregionale Disparitäten_US
dc.subject.keywordUnternehmenserfolgen_US
dc.subject.keywordWirtschaftszweigeen_US
dc.subject.keywordWestdeutschlanden_US
dc.subject.keywordBundesrepublik Deutschlanden_US
dc.subject.stwRäumliche Verteilungen_US
dc.subject.stwUnternehmensgründungen_US
dc.subject.stwErfolgsfaktoren_US
dc.subject.stwDeutschlanden_US
dc.titleRegional patterns and determinants of new firm formation and survival in Western Germanyen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn518511413en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:IAB-Discussion Paper, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
518511413.PDF373.29 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.