EconStor >
Max-Planck-Institut für Ökonomik, Jena >
Papers on Economics and Evolution, MPI für Ökonomik >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31837
  
Title:Is academic entrepreneurship good or bad for science? Empirical evidence from the Max Planck Society PDF Logo
Authors:Buenstorf, Guido
Issue Date:2006
Series/Report no.:Papers on economics and evolution 0617
Abstract:Based on new data, this paper studies invention disclosure, licensing, and firm formation activities of Max Planck Institute directors over the time period 1985-2004, and analyzes their effects on scientists’ publication and citation records. The results are consistent with prior findings that inventing does not adversely affect research output. More mixed results are obtained with regard to academic entrepreneurship. The analysis raises questions vis-à-vis earlier explanations for positive relationships between inventing and publishing. It finds little evidence than inventors learn from interacting with firms. Likewise, license revenues do not enable scientists to step up their research activities.
Subjects:Basic science
academic entrepreneurship
innovation
licensing
firm formation
JEL:I23
M33
O31
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Papers on Economics and Evolution, MPI für Ökonomik

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
522543936.pdf707.59 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31837

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.