Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31823
Authors: 
Coad, Alexander
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
Papers on economics and evolution 0703
Abstract: 
We survey the phenomenon of the growth of firms drawing on literature from economics, management, and sociology. We begin with a review of empirical 'stylised facts' before discussing theoretical contributions. Firm growth is characterized by a predominant stochastic element, making it difficult to predict. Indeed, previous empirical research into the determinants of firm growth has had a limited success. We also observe that theoretical propositions concerning the growth of firms are often amiss. We conclude that progress in this area requires solid empirical work, perhaps making use of novel statistical techniques.
Subjects: 
Firm Growth
Size Distribution
Growth Rates Distribution
Gibrat’s Law
Theory of the Firm
Diversification
‘Stages of Growth’ models
JEL: 
L25
L11
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
636.61 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.