Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31812
Authors: 
Buenstorf, Guido
Klepper, Steven
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
Papers on economics and evolution 0508
Abstract: 
We use new data on the location and background of entrants into the U.S. tire industry to analyze the factors that caused the industry to be so regionally concentrated around Akron, Ohio, a small city with no particular advantages for tire production. We analyze the states where firms entered and for the Ohio entrants the counties where they originated and entered, and we conduct various analyses of how proximity to other tire firms and to demanders affected the longevity of tire producers. We also examine how the heritage of the Ohio entrants influenced their longevity. Our findings suggest that the Akron tire cluster grew primarily through a process of organizational reproduction and heredity rather than through agglomeration economies, as has been commonly posited by scholars of the industry.
JEL: 
L65
R12
R30
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
376.11 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.