EconStor >
Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson (NY) >
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College >
Working Papers, Levy Economics Institute of Bard College >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31577
  
Title:Wage growth and the measurement of social security's financial condition PDF Logo
Authors:Gokhale, Jagadeesh
Issue Date:2006
Series/Report no.:Working papers // The Levy Economics Institute 461
Abstract:Government spending on the elderly is projected to increase rapidly as the American population becomes older. As a result, many policymakers and budget analysts are concerned about the continued viability of entitlement programs such as Social Security. The Social Security trustees' economic growth projections receive considerable attention because many people believe that higher growth would significantly improve the program's actuarial balance (that is, reduce its actuarial deficit). This belief is validated by Social Security trustees' calculations that show larger 75-year actuarial balances under faster assumed real wage growth rates. Since 2003 the trustees have reported the program's actuarial balance measured in perpetuity. But they do not provide sensitivity analysis that examines the impact of various assumptions on the infinite-term actuarial balance. This paper shows analytically that faster wage growth may reduce Social Security's infinite-term actuarial balance if the ratio of workers to retirees continues to decline rapidly beyond the 75th year. This result holds even if the decline in that ratio ceases after just two decades beyond the 75th year. The paper reports stylized calculations of the impact of real wage growth and demographic changeincluding time-varying rates of change based on official projections for the U.S. economyon Social Security's actuarial balance in a multi-period setting. Finally, the Social Security and Accounts Simulator (SSASIM) actuarial model of Social Security financing is used to estimate the degree to which increased wage growth could negatively affect the system's infinite-term actuarial balance. These results raise questions about the conventional wisdom that holds that improved wage growth would affect Social Security's financing, and how a widely used measure of Social Security's financing captures those effects.
Subjects:Social Security
wage growth
demographic change
infinite horizon
actuarial balance
sustainability
JEL:H55
E62
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Working Papers, Levy Economics Institute of Bard College

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
570158427.pdf317.69 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31577

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.