EconStor >
Claremont McKenna College >
Department of Economics, Claremont McKenna College >
Claremont Colleges Working Papers in Economics, Department of Economics, Claremont McKenna College >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31444
  
Title:The decision to work by married immigrant women: the role of extended family households PDF Logo
Authors:Antecol, Heather
Bedard, Kelly
Editors:Claremont Institute for Economic Policy Studies
Issue Date:2003
Series/Report no.:Working paper series // Claremont Institute for Economic Policy Studies 2002-34
Abstract:We find differential rates of cohabitation with adult relatives as well as differential impacts of that cohabitation on the probability of employment for married female immigrants across regions of origin. This suggests that traditions and/or cultural determinants of family structure influence female labor force participation. Not surprisingly, we also find that the labor supply response is biggest for immigrants with young children. This further suggests that cohabitation allows married immigrant women to share childcare and other household responsibilities, which in turn increases the probability that they work outside of the home.
Subjects:Family Structure
Female Labor Force Participation and Immigrants
JEL:J1
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Claremont Colleges Working Papers in Economics, Department of Economics, Claremont McKenna College

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
366451626.pdf141.4 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31444

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.