EconStor >
University of California (UC) >
UC Davis, Department of Economics >
Working Papers, Department of Economics, UC Davis >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31375
  
Title:Stuck on gold: real exchange rate volatility and the rise and fall of the gold standard, 1870 - 1939 PDF Logo
Authors:Chernyshoff, Natalia
Jacks, David S.
Taylor, Alan M.
Issue Date:2005
Series/Report no.:Working papers // University of California, Department of Economics 06,7
Abstract:Did adoption of the gold standard exacerbate or diminish macroeconomic volatility? Supporters thought so, critics thought not, and theory offers ambiguous messages. A hard exchange-rate regime such as the gold standard might limit monetary shocks if it ties the hands of policy makers. But any decision to forsake exchange-rate flexibility might compromise shock absorption in a world of real shocks and nominal stickiness. A simple model shows how a lack of flexibility can be discerned in the transmission of terms of trade shocks. Evidence on the relationship between real exchange rate volatility and terms of trade volatility from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century exposes a dramatic change. The classical gold standard did absorb shocks, but the interwar gold standard did not, and this historical pattern suggests that the interwar gold standard was a poor regime choice.
JEL:F33
F41
N10
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Working Papers, Department of Economics, UC Davis

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
508644593.pdf1.4 MBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31375

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.