EconStor >
Rutgers University >
Department of Economics, Rutgers University >
Working Papers, Department of Economics, Rutgers University >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31269
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGrubert, Harryen_US
dc.contributor.authorAltshuler, Rosanneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-16en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-14T11:01:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-14T11:01:31Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/31269-
dc.description.abstractProposals for the reform of the taxation of cross-border income are evaluated within the general context of the corporate tax in an open economy. We focus on the various behavioral decisions that can be affected such as the location of income and its repatriation. The two income tax proposals considered are: (1) dividend exemption and (2) burden neutral worldwide taxation in which all foreign subsidiary income is included currently in the U.S. worldwide tax base, and at the same time the corporate tax rate is lowered and overhead allocations to foreign income are eliminated so as to keep the overall U.S. tax burden on foreign income the same. We also consider the attractiveness of destination-based and origin-based consumption taxes. Our evaluation of reform options makes use of the best available information. We also present new information on the burden of the current system. However, there are many important unknown behavioral parameters required to judge international tax systems and this missing information, some of which may ultimately be unknowable, makes it difficult to make definitive recommendations. The burden neutral worldwide option seems to offer greater efficiency gains among the two income tax options, particularly because of reduced incentives for income shifting which wastes resources and distorts effective tax rates on investment. To be sure, the burden neutral worldwide option would increase effective tax rates on investment in low-tax countries while not increasing the average U.S. tax rate on foreign source income. The option requires a substantial reduction in the U.S. corporate tax rate. We suggest that increased capital mobility makes changing the mix of corporate and personal level taxation of business income appropriate even apart from the special issues of cross-border taxation such as repatriation taxes and income shifting opportunities that are the main subject of the paper.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherDep. of Economics, Rutgers, the State Univ. of New Jersey New Brunswick, NJen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking papers // Department of Economics, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey 2006,26en_US
dc.subject.jelH20en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordInternational taxationen_US
dc.subject.keywordmultinational corporationsen_US
dc.subject.keywordtax reformen_US
dc.titleCorporate taxes in the world economy: reforming the taxation of cross-border incomeen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn566318512en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:Working Papers, Department of Economics, Rutgers University

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
566318512.pdf230.54 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.