EconStor >
Rutgers University >
Department of Economics, Rutgers University >
Working Papers, Department of Economics, Rutgers University >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31268
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAjilore, Olugbengaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-23en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-14T11:01:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-14T11:01:31Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/31268-
dc.description.abstractWe present evidence that more ethnically fragmented communities spend, all else equal, more on police services than less fragmented communities. We introduce a model of spending on police services which we use to interpret the data. In this model, we assume that the decision to commit a crime is a rational consideration of the costs and benefits and that spending on police services reduces the attractiveness of committing a crime. We also assume that being a victim of crime affects a loss in utility. However this victimization cost, if victim and perpetrator are a different ethnicity, is greater than or equal to that if the perpetrator is the same ethnicity. A consequence of the model is that a higher level of spending on police services is associated with more ethnically fragmented communities only when agents suffer this differential cost of victimization. These results contribute to our understanding of the stylized fact that spending on police services is increasing at a time in which crime rates are falling. Further, our results provide empirical support for the contention that people have a larger cost of victimization when the perpetrator is a different ethnicity.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherDep. of Economics, Rutgers, the State Univ. of New Jersey New Brunswick, NJen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking papers // Department of Economics, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey 2007,08en_US
dc.subject.jelD70en_US
dc.subject.jelH76en_US
dc.subject.jelH41en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordEthnic Fragmentationen_US
dc.subject.keywordPoliceen_US
dc.subject.keywordCrimeen_US
dc.subject.keywordSocial Identityen_US
dc.subject.keywordPublic Goodsen_US
dc.subject.stwEthnische Gruppeen_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Beziehungenen_US
dc.subject.stwStädtische Bevölkerungsstrukturen_US
dc.subject.stwKriminalpolitiken_US
dc.subject.stwPolizeien_US
dc.subject.stwKommunale Ausgabenen_US
dc.subject.stwÖffentliches Guten_US
dc.titleEthnic fragmentation and police spending: social identity and a public gooden_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn568266935en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:Working Papers, Department of Economics, Rutgers University

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
568266935.pdf152.6 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.