EconStor >
Rutgers University >
Department of Economics, Rutgers University >
Working Papers, Department of Economics, Rutgers University >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31268
  
Title:Ethnic fragmentation and police spending: social identity and a public good PDF Logo
Authors:Ajilore, Olugbenga
Smith, John
Issue Date:2007
Series/Report no.:Working papers // Department of Economics, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey 2007,08
Abstract:We present evidence that more ethnically fragmented communities spend, all else equal, more on police services than less fragmented communities. We introduce a model of spending on police services which we use to interpret the data. In this model, we assume that the decision to commit a crime is a rational consideration of the costs and benefits and that spending on police services reduces the attractiveness of committing a crime. We also assume that being a victim of crime affects a loss in utility. However this victimization cost, if victim and perpetrator are a different ethnicity, is greater than or equal to that if the perpetrator is the same ethnicity. A consequence of the model is that a higher level of spending on police services is associated with more ethnically fragmented communities only when agents suffer this differential cost of victimization. These results contribute to our understanding of the stylized fact that spending on police services is increasing at a time in which crime rates are falling. Further, our results provide empirical support for the contention that people have a larger cost of victimization when the perpetrator is a different ethnicity.
Subjects:Ethnic Fragmentation
Police
Crime
Social Identity
Public Goods
JEL:D70
H76
H41
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Working Papers, Department of Economics, Rutgers University

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
568266935.pdf152.6 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/31268

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.