EconStor >
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen >
Ibero-Amerika-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (IAI), Universität Göttingen >
Discussion Papers, IAI, Universität Göttingen >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/27409
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeite, Phillippe G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-12-14en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-07T11:40:50Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-07T11:40:50Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/27409-
dc.description.abstractFollowing the topics discussed by Campante et al (2004), this paper contributes to the literature of the Brazilian racial discrimination by isolating the effect of intergeneration transmission of schooling and the school’s quality in the race discrimination effect. Instead of modelling just one mincer-type equation like others papers, it was decided to use the Two Stage Least Square Model where the first step of modelling control the endogeneity of individual schooling instrumenting it by family background and ability tests while attending school. The paper also provide a comparative profile of urban racial discrimination in the Northeast and the Southeast recognizing the important differences across regions in Brazil both in terms of economic development and racial composition of the population. As found by Campante et al (2004), results reveal that part of the component of wage differentials ordinarily attributed to labor market discrimination is actually explained by persistent educational inequalities between races. However because they didn’t control the potential bias due to the endogeneity of some variables, their discrimination effect is 15 to 19 percentage points higher than it should be. The mechanism of intergeneration transmission is correlated with financial constraints and higher education of parents because blacks have lower elasticities of education with respect to parent’s education due to selection and causation. Even controlling the model using instruments, Private sector remains as the sector where race discrimination is really an issue. Moreover, the regional profile suggests that the labor market is a more important locus of the racial issue in the Southeast than in the Northeast, although the significant presence in both regions. However, we are not controlling for selection bias and consequently the results must be viewed with caution because it is not sure how precise the estimations are.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherIbero-Amerika-Inst. für Wirtschaftsforschung Göttingenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion papers // Ibero America Institute for Economic Research 118en_US
dc.subject.jelJ15en_US
dc.subject.jelJ24en_US
dc.subject.jelJ31en_US
dc.subject.jelJ71en_US
dc.subject.jelJ78en_US
dc.subject.jelI21en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleRace discrimination or inequality of opportunities: the Brazilian caseen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn504473182en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:Discussion Papers, IAI, Universität Göttingen

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
504473182.PDF306.93 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.