EconStor >
Leibniz Universität Hannover >
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät, Universität Hannover >
Diskussionspapiere, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät, Universität Hannover >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/27181
  
Title:Cyclical effects on job-to-job mobility: an aggregated analysis on microeconomic data PDF Logo
Authors:Cornelißen, Thomas
Hübler, Olaf
Schneck, Stefan
Issue Date:2007
Series/Report no.:Discussion papers // School of Economics and Management of the Hanover Leibniz University 371
Abstract:This paper analyses cyclical effects on job-to-job mobility using German data. The focus lies on the influence of the regional unemployment rate and the regional growth of the GDP. Job-to- job transitions are fragmented into external and internal movements. The innovation is to describe mobility using background information why the moves occur because the available empirical labour market literature is in deficit with analyzing the motive why these transitions occur with respect to the business cycle. External movements can be introduced by quits or forced by layoffs, the end of the contract, or other reasons such as bankruptcy of a firm. Internal transitions are classified as promotions and transfers. Our estimates show that job-to-job mobility is strongly affected by the business cycle. External movements are more likely in times of growing GDP and less probable when the unemployment rate increases. For internal transitions our results suggest that Eastern and Western Germany’s workers differ in their mobility properties along the business cycle.
Subjects:job-to-job mobility
internal and external moves
promotions
quits
lay-offs
business cycle
JEL:E32
J62
J63
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Diskussionspapiere, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät, Universität Hannover

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
549844902.PDF704.86 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/27181

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.