Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/26099
Authors: 
Koethenbuerger, Marko
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo working paper 2054
Abstract: 
Federal and state governments often differ in the capacity to pre-commit to expenditure and tax policy. Whether the implied sequence of public decisions has any efficiency implications is the subject of this paper. We resort to a setting which contrary to most of the literature does not exhibit a perfect tax-base overlap. We show that a federal government's pre-commitment capacity is welfare-improving. Efficiency, however, does not improve over all decision margins. The welfare-increasing policy entails a more distorted level of public consumption. Moreover, welfare may also improve if local governments are able to pre-commit towards the upper level. The rationale is that although federal transfers are formally unconditional they nevertheless entail a tax-price effect; thereby potentially counteracting incentives to engage in a “race to the bottom” in fiscal competition among local governments.
JEL: 
H71
H23
H10
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
603.08 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.