Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/25075
Authors: 
Ritschl, Albrecht
Uebele, Martin
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
SFB 649 discussion paper 2005,056
Abstract: 
This paper examines the comovement of the stock market and of real activity in Germany before World War I under the efficient market hypothesis. We employ multivariate spectral analysis to compare rivaling national product estimates to stock market behavior in the frequency domain. Close comovement of one series with the stock market enables us to decide between various rivaling business cycle chronologies. We find that business cycle dates obtained from deflated national product series are severely distorted by interference with the implicit price deflator. Among the nominal series, the income estimate of Hoffmann (1965) correlates best with the stock market, while the tax based estimate of Hoffmann and Müller (1959) is too smooth especially before 1890. We find impressive comovement between the stock market and nominal wages, a sub-series of Hoffmann's income estimate. We can show that a substantial part of this nominal wage series is driven by data on real investment activity. Our findings confirm the traditional business cycle chronology for Germany of Burns and Mitchell (1946) and Spiethoff (1955), and lead us to discard later, rivaling business cycle chronologies.
Subjects: 
Business Cycle Chronology
Imperial Germany
Spectral Analysis
Efficient Market Hypothesis
JEL: 
E32
E44
N13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
559.42 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.