Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/24919
Authors: 
Chakrabarty, Debajyoti
Chanda, Areendam
Ghate, Chetan
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
Papers on entrepreneurship, growth and public policy 2106
Abstract: 
We construct an overlapping generations model to study the effect of capital controls on human capital investments and the incidence of redistributive politics in a growing economy. We argue that the conventional wisdom linking higher capital controls to lower growth is reproduced only when an economy is sufficiently developed. For under-developed countries, higher capital controls are beneficial for human capital accumulation suggesting that the wisdom does not apply. In an augmented version of the model, we show that a modern sector, characterized by positive levels of investment in education, may not exist unless capital controls are sufficiently high. In particular, higher capital controls make it feasible for a modern sector to exist by lowering the threshold income level required by workers to invest in human capital. These results are consistent with recent evidence suggesting that capital account liberalization positively affects growth only after a country has achieved a certain threshold level of absorptive capacities.
Subjects: 
Capital Flight
Economic Growth
Human Capital
Income Distribution
Long Term Capital Movements
Optimal Taxation
JEL: 
D33
E62
F21
O19
O40
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
517.01 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.