EconStor >
Institut für Weltwirtschaft (IfW), Kiel >
Kieler Arbeitspapiere, IfW >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/24878
  
Title:The role of production technology for productivity spillovers from multinationals: firm-level evidence for Hungary PDF Logo
Authors:Görg, Holger
Hijzen, Alexander
Muraközy, Balázs
Issue Date:2009
Citation:[Series:] Kiel working paper [No.:] 1482 [Editor:] Kiel Inst. for the World Economy, Kiel
Series/Report no.:Kiel working paper 1482
Abstract:This paper analyses the potential for productivity spillovers from inward foreign direct investment using administrative panel data on firms for Hungary. We hypothesise that the potential for spillovers is related to observable characteristics of the production process of foreign affiliates, and evaluate this empirically. We further explore the role of competition in explaining productivity spillovers within industries. Our empirical analysis yields a number of important findings. First, we show that the potential for spillovers is importantly related to the production technology of the sectors and foreign affiliates. Firms that relocate labour-intensive activities to Hungary to exploit differences in labour costs are unlikely to generate productivity spillovers, while spillovers increase in the capital intensity of foreign affiliates. Second, we find that spillovers differ markedly in the early and later stages of transition, and that there are differences between small and large firms. Furthermore, foreign presence tends to affect the productivity of domestic firms negatively whenever MNEs produce for the domestic market.
Subjects:Foreign direct investment
productivity spillovers
exporting
competition
JEL:F23
Document Type:Working Paper
Appears in Collections:Kieler Arbeitspapiere, IfW
Publikationen von Forscherinnen und Forschern des IfW

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
591346869.PDF286.42 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX
Share on:http://hdl.handle.net/10419/24878

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.