EconStor >
Institut für Weltwirtschaft (IfW), Kiel >
Kieler Arbeitspapiere, IfW >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/24833
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMeier, Helenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRehdanz, Katrinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-01en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-06T10:14:19Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-06T10:14:19Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationKiel working paper 1439 Kiel Inst. for the World Economy, Kielen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/24833-
dc.description.abstractIn Great Britain several policy measures have been implemented in order to increase energy efficiency and to reduce carbon emissions. In the domestic sector, these targets can be achieved by improving space heating efficiency and, hence, decrease heating expenditures. However, before implementing policy measures it is necessary to better understand determinants of heating expenditures. In this paper, we examine determinants of heating expenditures which include socio-economic and building characteristics as well as heating technologies and meteorological observations. In contrast to most other studies, we use Panel data for investigating household’s demand for heating in Great Britain. Our analysis covers 15 years, starting in 1991, and more than 5,000 households that have been re-interviewed annually; altogether our sample covers more than 64,000 households. Our empirical findings suggest that in Great Britain owners generally have higher heating expenditures than renters. These differences in expenditures can be explained by building characteristics. Renters mainly live in flats and most of the owners live in detached/semi-detached houses. Generally, flats are more energy efficient than houses. Our results also imply that a number of socio-economic criteria have a significant influence on heating expenditures, independent from the central heating fuel type. Policy measures should not only focus on insulation standards but also on different household types. Especially elderly people and households with children should be target groups.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherKiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW) Kielen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKiel working paper 1439en_US
dc.subject.jelC23en_US
dc.subject.jelD12en_US
dc.subject.jelQ4en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.keywordspace heatingen_US
dc.subject.keywordincome elasticityen_US
dc.subject.keywordprice elasticityen_US
dc.subject.stwWärmeenergieen_US
dc.subject.stwHeizungsanlageen_US
dc.subject.stwVerbraucherausgabenen_US
dc.subject.stwElastizitäten_US
dc.subject.stwWohnungen_US
dc.subject.stwWohneigentumen_US
dc.subject.stwEnergiesparenen_US
dc.subject.stwPanelen_US
dc.subject.stwGroßbritannienen_US
dc.titleDeterminants of residential space heating expenditures in Great Britainen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn573275785en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
Appears in Collections:Kieler Arbeitspapiere, IfW
Publikationen von Forscherinnen und Forschern des IfW

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
573275785.PDF356.74 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.