EconStor >
Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung (ZEW), Mannheim >
ZEW Discussion Papers >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:

http://hdl.handle.net/10419/24133
  

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorConrad, Klausen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoschel, Henrikeen_US
dc.contributor.authorLöschel, Andreasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-16T14:49:10Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-16T14:49:10Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/24133-
dc.description.abstractThe objective of our analysis is to find out whether an increase in working time without pay compensation can be considered an adequate policy to reduce unemployment. From the perspective of economic theory the outcome is in general ambiguous: On the one hand, as the increase in working time raises labour productivity per employee, conditional demand for labour will increase (substitution effect) and conditional demand for intermediate inputs will decline. Since, on the other hand, workers do have a longer working time anyway, no positive effect on the number of persons employed can be expected. However, output of the manufacturing industry, and thus unconditional demand for labour, capital and intermediate goods, will increase (output effect). In order to sell the additional output, firms have to lower prices. Depending on the price elasticities, revenues and hence profits will change. We quantify the employment effects of an economy-wide increase in weekly normal hours in Germany on the basis of a CGE model using an input-output framework for all sectors of the economy. Our simulation results support the argument of the opponents of longer working time that not more jobs will be created. However, when we recycled the higher tax revenues from GDP growth to lower the contribution to social security, then we have been able to support the claim of the proponents that more jobs will be created.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherZentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung (ZEW) Mannheim-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesZEW Discussion Papers 05-42en_US
dc.subject.jelJ23en_US
dc.subject.jelD58en_US
dc.subject.jelJ21en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordunemploymenten_US
dc.subject.keywordlabour market rigiditiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordlonger working hoursen_US
dc.subject.keywordcomputable general equilibrium modellingen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitszeitflexibilisierungen_US
dc.subject.stwBeschäftigungseffekten_US
dc.subject.stwMakroökonomischer Einflussen_US
dc.subject.stwAllgemeines Gleichgewichten_US
dc.subject.stwSchätzungen_US
dc.subject.stwDeutschlanden_US
dc.titleNot Employed 37 Hours or Employed 41? A CGE Analysis for Germanyen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn490476627en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:zewdip:3285-
Appears in Collections:Publikationen von Forscherinnen und Forschern des ZEW
ZEW Discussion Papers

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
dp0542.pdf265.18 kBAdobe PDF
No. of Downloads: Counter Stats
Show simple item record
Download bibliographical data as: BibTeX

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.